The Library Company of Philadelphia 2015-2016 Research Fellows

 

National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Fellows

Dr. Christopher J. Bonner, Department of History, University of Maryland, The Price of Citizenship: Black Protest, American Law, and the Shaping of Society, 1827-1868.

Dr. Laura T. Igoe, Princeton University Art Museum, Art and Ecology in the Early Republic.

Dr. Christopher N. Phillips, Department of English, Lafayette College, The Hymnal before the Notes: A History of Reading and Practice. 

 

Mellon Scholars Program in African American History Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Jessica Marie Johnson, Department of History, Michigan State University, Practicing Freedom: Intimacy, Kinship, and Property in Atlantic New Orleans, 1685-1810.

 

Mellon Scholars Program in African American History Dissertation Fellow

Michael Dickinson, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Delaware, Surviving Slavery: Oppression and Social Rebirth in the Urban British Atlantic, 1680-1807.

 

Program in Early American Economy and Society Post-Doctoral Fellows

Dr. Lindsay Regele, Department of History, Miami University, Manufacturing Advantage:  War, the State, and the Origins of American Industrialization.

Dr. Sara Damiano, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University, Gendering the Work of Debt Collection: Women, Law, and the Credit Economy in New England, 1730-1790.

 

Albert M. Greenfield Foundation Dissertation Fellows

Julia Dauer, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Natural History and First Person Prose in Early America, 1783-1830.

Sonia Hazard, Ph.D. Candidate in Religious Studies, Duke University, The American Tract Society and the Materiality of Print in Antebellum America.

 

Library Company Short-Term Fellows
Mellon Scholars Program in African American History

Julia Bernier, Ph.D. Candidate in Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, A Papered Freedom: Self-Purchase and Compensated Manumission in the Antebellum United States.

Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, Department of African and African American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Ghost Values of the Domestic Cadaver Slave Trade.

Dexter Gabriel, Ph.D. Candidate in History, State University of New York, Stony Brook, A West Indian Jubilee in America.

Holly Pinheiro, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Iowa, Men of Color to Arms!: Race, Manhood, and Citizenship during the Civil War Era.

 

Program in Early American Economy and Society Short-Term Fellows

Jessica Blake, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of California at Davis, Caribbean Taste, Production, and Regionalism in Early Republic New Orleans.

Patrick Callaway, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Maine, Grain, Warfare, and the Reunification of the British Atlantic Economy, 1768-1815.

Emilie Connolly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, New York University, Indian Trust Funds and the Routes of American Capitalism, 1795-1865.

Dr. Kim Gruenwald, Department of History, Kent University, Philadelphia Merchants on Western Waters: Commerce, Networks, and Speculation from the Seven Years' War through the Louisiana Purchase.

Rachel Knecht, Ph.D. Candidate in History Brown University, Quantifying the Economy in the Industrial Age.

Katie Moore, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Boston University, "A Just and Honest Valuation": Money and Value in Colonial America, 1690-1750.

Joshua Rothman, Department of History, University of Alabama, The Ledger and the Chain: The Men Who Made America's Domestic Slave Trade into Big Business.

Justin Simard, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Pennsylvania, The Technocrats: Lawyers and Capitalism in Early National America, 1780-1870.

Jackson Tait,  Ph.D. Candidate in History, Queens University, UK, Assessing Risk and Reputation in Atlantic Maritime Enterprise: The Development of Marine Underwriting Methods and Standards, 1770-1900.

Sarah Templier, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Johns Hopkins University, Between Merchants, Shopkeepers, Tailors, and Thieves: Circulating and Consuming Clothes, Textiles, and Fashion in French and British North America, 1730-1780.

Erin Trahey, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Cambridge, Women and the Making of Colonial Jamaica Economy and Society, 1740-1850.

Shuichi Wanibuchi, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, A Colony by Design: Nature, Knowledge, and the Transformation of Landscape in the Delaware Valley, 1680-1780.

 

McLean Contributionship Fellow

Dr. Allan Kulikoff, Department of History, University of Georgia, Many Masks of Benjamin Franklin.

 

Reese Fellow in American Bibliography
Dr. Joseph Rezek, Department of English, Boston University, Early Black Writing and the Book.

 

Anthony N.B. and Beatrice W.B. Garvan Fellow in American Material Culture

Isaac King,   Ph.D. Candidate in History of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh, The Witness in the Shadows: Authenticity and Authority in the Early National Portraiture of George Washington.

 

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellow

Alyssa Reichardt,  Ph.D. Candidate in History, Yale University, War for the Interior: Imperial Conflict and the Formation of North American and Transatlantic Communications Infrastructure, 1735-1774.

 

Fellow in the Program in Early American Medicine, Science, and Society

Kathryn Falvo,  Ph.D. Candidate in History, Pennsylvania State University, Molding the Destiny of the Nation: Women in Nineteenth Century Dietetic Reform.

 

Fellow in the Visual Culture Program
Dr. Ellen Handy, Department of Art, City College of New York, CUNY, Histories of Photography: An Introduction.

 

Deutsch Fellow in Women's History

Jacqueline Beatty, Ph.D. Candidate in History, George Mason University, In Dependence: Women's Protection and Subordination as Power in Early America, 1750-1820.

 

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Short-term Fellows Jointly Sponsored by the Library Company and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania

 

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellows

Jeffery Appelhans, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Delaware, Catholic Persuasion: Power and Prestige in Early American Civil Life.

Dr. Alex Black, Department of English, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, The Production of Freedom: Print and Performance in American Abolitionism.

Dr. Todd Carmody, Program in History and Literature, Harvard University, Racial Handicap: Uplift and Rehabilitation in Postbellum America.

Jessica Conrad, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Delaware, At the Bottom of the Bottle: Consumer Resistance, Racial Uplift, and Woman Suffrage in Temperance Literature.

Ben Davidson, Ph.D. Candidate in History, New York University, Freedom's Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation.

Bradley Dixon, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Texas at Austin, Republic of Indians: Indigenous vassals, subjects, and citizens in Early America.

Dr. Erica Fretwell, Department of English, State University of New York at Albany, The War of the Dots.

Emma Gallwey, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, Public Credit in the Development of American Political Economy, 1776-1845.

Kathryn Lasdow, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Columbia University, "Spirit of Improvement": Construction, Conflict, & Community in Early-National Port Cities.

Kevin Waite, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Pennsylvania, The Slave South in the Far West: California, the Pacific, and Proslavery Visions of Empire, 1800-1865.

Andrew Zonderman, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Emory University, Embracing Empire: Eighteenth-Century German Migrants and the Development of the British Imperial System.

 

Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Fellows

Dr. Carolyn Eastman, Department of History, Virginia Commonwealth University, The Strange Genius of Mr. O: Oratory and Transatlantic Celebrity in Early America.

Dr. Robert Gamble, Department of History, University of Kansas, Governed by Numbers: Lotteries, Capitalism, and the American State, 1776-1929.

 

Barra Foundation International Fellows

Dr. Nathalie Caron, Department of English, Université  of Paris Sorbonne, "Freeing the Mind from the Shackles of Religion": The Significance of the French Philosophes' Philosophy for American Freethought.

Dr. Justin Roberts, Department of History, Dalhousie University, A Swarm of People: The Barbadian Diaspora and the Expansion of the English Atlantic, 1640-1690.

 

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Historical Society of Pennsylvania Short-term Fellows

 

McFarland Fellow

Dr.  Alyssa Ribeiro, Research Scholar, Center for the Study of Women, University of California at Los Angeles, Making the City Brotherly: Black and Latino Community Activism in Philadelphia, 1960s to 1980s.

 

McNeil Fellows

Dr. Meredith Neuman, Department of English, Clark University, Coming to Terms with Early American Poetry.

Justine Oliva, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of New Hampshire, Anne Lynch Botta and the Formation of America's Professional Middle-Class.

Johanna Ortner, Ph.D. Candidate in African American Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst, "Whatever concerns them, as a race, concerns me:" The Life and Activism of Frances Ellen Watkins Harper.

Catherine Tourangeau, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Yale University, An Ocean of Joiners: Voluntary Associations in the Anglo-American Atlantic, 1740-1800.

 

Balch Fellows in Ethnic Studies

Dr. Duane Corpis, Department of History, New York University, Shanghai, Overseas Charity and German Protestantism: Global Networks, Local Norms, 16th-19th Centuries.

Stephen O'Donnell, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Strathclyde, The Transatlantic Slovak National Movement, 1890-1920.

 

Greenfield Fellow in 20th-Century History

Dr. Marc-William Palen, Department of History, University of Exeter, Pax Economica: The Global Struggle for Free Trade and Peace, 1896-1946.

Richardson Dilworth Fellowship for Law, Politics, and Reform

Jack Furniss,  Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Virginia, States of the Union: The Political Center in the Civil War North.

 

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Mellon Long-term Dissertation Fellows in Early American Literature and Material Texts, Jointly Sponsored with the McNeil Center for Early American Studies

Daniel Diez Couch, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of California at Los Angeles, The Imperfect Form: Literary Fragments and Politics in the Early Republic.

Andrew Inchiosa, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of Chicago, Found among the Papers of the Early Republic.