The Library Company of Philadelphia 2016-2017 Research Fellows

 

Long-Term Fellows

 

National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Fellows

 

Dr. William Coleman, Department of the History of Art, Washington University in St. Louis, Painting Houses: The Domestic Landscape of the Hudson River School.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Thomas Perry, Department of Social Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University, Protectors of the Peace: Church Tribunals and the Making of American Religious and Civil Authority, 1780-1860.

 

Dr. Joseph Rezek, Department of English, Boston University, Early Black Writing and the Politics of Print.

 

Mellon Scholars Program in African American History Postdoctoral Fellow

 

Dr. Vanessa Holden, Department of History, Michigan State University, Forming Intimacies: Queer Kinship and Resistance in the Antebellum American Atlantic.

 

Dr. Rashauna Johnson, Department of History, Dartmouth College, “A Looking Glass for the World”: Slavery, Immigration, and Overlapping Diasporas in the U.S. South.

 

Mellon Scholars Program in African American History Dissertation Fellows

 

Crystal Webster, Ph.D. Candidate in Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Fugitive Play, Discursive Resistance: The Politics of Black Childhood in Nineteenth-Century America.

 

Nakia Parker, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Texas, Austin, Trails of Tears and Freedom: Slavery, Migration, and Emancipation in the Southwest Borderlands, 1830-1887.

 

Program in Early American Economy and Society Post-Doctoral Fellows

 

Dr. Michael Blaakman, Department of History, Yale University, Speculation Nation: Land and Mania in the Revolutionary American Republic, 1776-1803. 

 

Dr. Mara Caden, Department of History, Yale University, Mint Conditions: The Politics and Geography of Money in Britain and its Empire, 1650-1750.

 

Program in Early American Economy and Society Dissertation Fellows

 

Jessica Blake, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of California-Davis, A Taste for Africa: Imperial Fantasy and Garment Commerce in Revolutionary-Era New Orleans.  

 

Amy Sopcak-Joseph, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Connecticut, Converting Rags into Gold: “Godey’s Lady’s Book,” Female Consumers, and the Business of Periodical Publishing in the Nineteenth Century

 

Albert M. Greenfield Foundation Dissertation Fellows

 

Nicole Dressler, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Northern Illinois University, The “Vile Commodity”: Morality, Convict Servitude, and the Rise of Humanitarianism in the Eighteenth-Century Anglo-American World.

 

William Fenton, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Fordham University, Unpeaceable Kingdom: Fighting Quakers, Revolutionary Violence, and the Antebellum Novel.

 

Library Company Short-Term Fellows

 

Mellon Scholars Program in African American History

 

Dr. Tara Bynum, Department of English, Rutgers University, Reading Pleasures.

Dr. James Ford, Department of English, Occidental College, Disheveling the Origins: Impossible Canonicity and African Diasporic Writing.

 

Damon Turner, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Morgan State University, The Reinventing of an Abolitionist: The Transatlantic Study of the United States, Sierra Leone, England, and the Quest for an Omaginary Homeland in Africa through the Eyes of Paul Cuffe, 1776-1817.

 

Program in Early American Economy and Society Short-Term Fellows

 

Dr. Guadalupe Carrasco-Gonzalez, Department of History, University of Cadiz, Spain, Maritime Traffic between Philadelphia and Cadiz (Spain) and the U.S. Merchants in Cádiz during the Revolutionary and  Napoleonic Wars.  

 

Dan Du, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Georgia, This World in a Teacup: Chinese-American Tea Trade, 1784-1860.

 

Dr. Lindsay Keiter, Department of History, The College of William and Mary, Uniting Interests: The Economic Functions of Marriage in America, 1750-1860.

 

Alicia Maggard, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Brown University, Steamboats on the Ohio River in the Nineteenth Century.    

 

Ernesto Mercado-Montero, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Texas at Austin, Saltwater Empire: The Caribs and the Politics of Smuggling, Insurgency, and the Slave Trade in the Circum-Caribbean, 1763-1833.

 

Scott Miller, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Virginia, A Merchant’s Republic: Independence, Depression, and the Development of American Capitalism, 1760-1807.

 

Franklin Sammons, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of California, Berkeley, The Long Life of Yazoo: Land Speculation, Finance, and Dispossession in the Southeastern Borderlands, 1789-1840.

 

Eric Sears, Ph.D. Candidate in History, St. Louis University, The Political Economy of Crisis, 1848-1860: Money and Banking in the Atlantic Origins of America’s Panicked Decade.

 

Liat Spiro, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, Drawing Capital: Depiction, Machine Tools, and the Political Economy of Industrial Knowledge, 1824-1914.

 

McLean Contributionship Fellow

 

Jordan Taylor, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Indiana University, “On the Ocean of News”: North American Information Networks in the Age of Revolution.

 

Reese Fellow in American Bibliography
Blevin Shelnutt, Ph.D. Candidate in English, New York University, Print Capital: Broadway and the Making of Mass Culture.


Anthony N.B. and Beatrice Garvan Fellow in American Material Culture

Jamie Brummitt, Ph.D. Candidate in Religion, Duke University, Protestant Relics: Religion, Objects, and the Art of Mourning in the Early American Republic.

 

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellow

Dr. Sean Moore, Department of English, University of New Hampshire, Slavery and Abolition in the Making of the Library Company of Philadelphia.

 

Fellow in the Program in Early American Medicine, Science, and Society

Miriam Rich, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, Monstrous Childbirth: Concepts of Defective Reproduction in American Medicine, 1830-1920.

 

Fellow in the Visual Culture Program

 

Kathryn Desplanque, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, Duke University, Papermania: The Popular Printed Image, Mass Customization, and the Nineteenth-Century Consumer.

 

Deutsch Fellow in Women’s History

 

Magdalena Zapędowska, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Lydia Sigourney, Maria Gowen Brooks, and the Materiality of Antebellum Poetry.

 

Short-term Fellows Jointly Sponsored by the Library Company and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania

 

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellows

 

Kristen Beales, Ph.D. Candidate in History, The College of William and Mary, Religion and Commerce in Eighteenth-Century America.

 

Cassandra Berman, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Brandeis University, Motherhood and the Court of Public Opinion: Transgressive Maternity in America, 1768-1868.

 

Andrea Blandford, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Rutgers University, Labor and the Visualization of Knowledge in American Geological Surveys, 1780-1860.

 

Dr. Lucas Dietrich, Department of English, Lesley University, J.B. Lippincott Co., Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Early Mexican American Literature.

 

Dr. Katherine Ibbett, Department of French, University College London, Liquid Empire: Building the French Mississippi.

 

Dr. Hans Leaman, Department of History, Yale University, Whitefield among the Pennsylvania Pietists.

 

Katherine Mintie, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, University of California, Berkeley, Rights and Reproductions? Commercial Photography and Copyright Law in the United States, 1884-1909.

 

Dr. Rachel Monroy, Department of History, University of South Carolina, The Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson Digital Edition.

 

Christoph Nitschke, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Oxford, America in the World of Crisis: The Panic of 1873 and U.S. Foreign Relations.

 

Johanna Seibert, Ph.D. Candidate in American Studies, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Networks of Taste: The Early African Caribbean Press in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World.

 

René José Silva, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Florida International University, The Aftermath of Revolution in Pennsylvania.

 

Katherine Thompson, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of California, San Diego, “Dens of Iniquity”: George Lippard, Seduction, and Competing Visions of Masculine Brotherhood.

 

Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Fellows

 

Dr. Sally Hadden, Department of History, Western Michigan University, The Earliest U.S. Supreme Court.

 

Spencer Wells, Ph.D. Candidate in History, The College of William and Mary, Heaven’s Exiles: Excommunicates and the Reformation of American Christianity, 1750-1830.

 

Barra Foundation International Fellows

 

Dr. Esther Sahle, Department of History, University of Bremen, A Faith of Merchants: Quakers and Institutional Change in the Early Modern Atlantic.

 

Hannah Young, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University College London, The Johnstons: Family, Property, and the Atlantic World.

 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania Short-term Fellows

 

McFarland Fellow

 

Jonathan Lande, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Brown University, Disciplining Freedom: Union Army Slave Rebels and Emancipation in the Civil War Courts-Martial.

 

McNeil Fellows

 

Michael Hattem, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Yale University, The Past is Prologue: The Origins of American History Culture, 1730-1800.

 

Bethany Mowry, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Oklahoma, Relative Distances: Men and Women on the Philadelphia Waterfront, 1770-1830.

 

Marissa C. Rhodes, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University at Buffalo, Body Work: Wet-Nurses and Politics of the Breast in the Revolutionary Atlantic.

 

Dr. Amber Shaw, Department of English, Coe College, The Fabric of the Nation: Textiles, Nationhood, and Identity in the Mid-Nineteenth Century.

 

Dilworth Fellow

 

Mary Freeman, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Columbia University, Letter Writing and Politics in the Campaign against Slavery in the United States, 1830-1870.

 

Balch Fellows in Ethnic Studies

 

Muiris MacGiollabhuí, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of California, Santa Cruz, Carrying the Green Bough: An Atlantic History of the United Irishmen, 1795-1830.

 

Dr. Raluca-Nicoleta Rogoveanu, Department of Modern Languages and Communication Sciences, Ovidius University, Constanta, Romania, Becoming Romanian-American: A Study of the First Romanian Ethnic Organizations in Philadelphia.

 

Greenfield Fellow in 20th-Century History

 

Chris Babits, Ph.D. Candidate in History, The University of Texas at Austin, To Cure a Sinful Nation: A Cultural and Intellectual History of Conversion Therapy in the United States from the Second World War to the Present Day.